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Texas Jack Jr & The Crown Prince of Denmark

A true story of an encounter between Texas Jack Junior, an American cowboy performer in several Wild West shows, and Frederick VIII of Denmark, the Crown Prince and heir apparent.


From the New York Tribune, October 1894.



The following story is going the rounds of social circles in Copenhagen, Denmark:


The Crown Prince, who loves to take long walks, was promenading the other day along the Strandney when he came across one of the toll-keepers. After paying his tax, he began a conversation with the good man, sitting on the bench which the keeper occupied.


Crown Prince (later King) Frederick VIII of Denmark.

A few minutes later, a rider came running towards them. The Crown prince recognized him as "Texas Jack," who had ridden in several races recently. The sportsman neither knew the Crown Prince nor that he was supposed to pay a toll for the privilege of using the street. The keeper was obliged to catch the bridle of "Texas Jack's" steed, as, speaking no Danish, the latter did not understand the demands made upon him and wished to push by. "Texas Jack" was growing angry when His Royal Highness stepped forward and announced in English that users of the way had to pay 10 oere.


Texas Jack (Junior)

Upon hearing this, the long-haired rider at once put his hand in his pocket, pulled out 25 oere, and gave the money to the Crown Prince. The latter offered to return him 15 oere, but the Yankee, with a majestic wave of his whip, told the Crown Prince to keep the change as a reward for helping out in his difficulty.



On the following day, the Crown Prince went to the races. Among the competitors was "Texas Jack." A few minutes before he was to show the skill of himself and the horse, he rode up in front of the royal pavilion to make the customary obeisance to the King. But he almost dropped his reins when, looking up, he saw the man to whom he had given the fee on the preceding day occupying the place reserved for the Crown Prince. His Royal Highness greeted him, however, most heartily, and "Texas Jack" rode away smiling and to victory.



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